Plum Tree Books Blog

"Where Words Grow On Trees"

Dr Niamh:

I really enjoyed having a piece I had written some time ago reblogged to the Happy Honkers blog site. Thank you!

Originally posted on Ripples in Water:

This article Defining Metaphysical Literature was re-posted from https://ontheplumtree.wordpress.com/

Thanks to Niamh Clune for the comprehensive definition

The term, Metaphysical literature, originally referred to poetic works from the 17th century and defined intellectually challenging poetry. Striving to incorporate the incorporeal, the transcendent, the noumenal, the subject matter itself posed a problem and poses it still. According to philosophers such as Nietzsche and Kant, nothing can be known about noumenal reality, not even that it exists. Yet, throughout the ages, humankind has striven to express the notion of soul, the fervour and truth accompanying vision and revelation, the divinity that speaks from within.

Early metaphysical poets such as John Donne extended metaphors that compared very dissimilar things. This was to make us think, to try to express the paradoxical nature of all things metaphysical. After all, in the search for truth and meaning, a truth is only considered a truth if it…

View original 224 more words

About Dr Niamh

I am doing what I love most: writing children's books. As a child, learning new words was a delicious delight. Tasting them roll around my tongue, practicing pronunciation, then trotting them out whenever possible, made me feel very clever indeed. Children of today are no different. They love saying new-really-difficult-to-pronounce words, (useful for spells or superheroes). So, I prefer not to censor broader vocabulary. I believe we should never 'talk down' to shapers-of-the-future but encourage them always to think their best and realise their astonishing potential. They are so bright, inquisitive and imaginative! For this reason, when hard-to-pronounce-big words creep into my stories (because they serve a purpose) and strut across the page full of self-importance, I give them permission to show off. Why not! They have much to teach us about language. It is easy to call on the little words to tell simple, contextual stories about them and make their meaning clear. Words should tease, disrupt and challenge. Sentences should say exactly what is meant, without too much meandering. Apart from all that, I love making up new words that include lots-of-things-all-at-once. (I have even written in ant-language!) And plots! Plots must be magical, full of childhood self-empowerment, positive, with inwoven facts and strong elements of personal development. Lastly, at Dr. Niamh Children's Books, we endeavour to uphold good grammar. In the interests of technique, art, literacy and creativity, a child needs to learn the rules of grammar first before s/he knows how to break them successfully. If pushed to blow my own trumpet (better than blowing someone else's and which, will only happen when forced to sell something), I would say I write modern children's classics: content rich with great vocabulary and little gems of wisdom that might keep us company into adulthood. I hope you and your children will enjoy reading my stories as much as I love writing them. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination.

2 comments on “

  1. thiskidreviewsbooks
    November 28, 2012

    I like the picture! :)

    Like

  2. ontheplumtree
    November 28, 2012

    Lol! Erik! Thank you. I will tell Tahlia!

    Like

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