Dr Niamh's Plum Tree Creative Community

Who is on the plum tree?

Insights With Dr. Niamh Clune ~ To Feed A Parching Heart!

Me and my soul have become friends, and neither is capable now of betraying the other. So then, must I not take care of the words I use that bear witness to my soul in the world? (inspired by Paolo Coelho) Niamh Clune 2014

I was asked once to describe my idea of good writing…the kind of writing to which I aspire…

Su Blackwell

Su Blackwell

The wordsmith is a mother. And like any mother, she needs ultimate patience with her children. She must coax, stage-direct, edit and discipline the soul of each and every word ~ from smallest to largest. She wants her children to grow into beautiful prose that uplifts and allows Soul into life. She teaches her sentences to be uncluttered by adverbs and adjectives. She does not encourage them to be overly lofty, yet expects them to be thoughtful. She delights in what words do, how they sound, taste and feel ~ how, when combined with care, they sing a melody, weave a tale, excite a rhythm, strum a heart, or open the mind’s eye.

She wants you to enjoy the fruits of her labour. After all, to craft her children well, she has taken Heaven by storm and stolen fire from the gods to nourish the parching hearts of those who stray into her garden in need of nourishment or solace.

She is not afraid of defiance.

Her grammar is good ~ good enough to challenge the rules. She believes in consistency and can’t abide sloppy metaphors. She wants her characters to think and feel independently; intimacies should speak from one heart to another.

She re-arranges words to paint pictures of light as well as dark and is brave enough to shrink from neither. Even if she describes Hell, she does so, beautifully…

(c) 2014 Niamh Clune

Advertisements

About Dr Niamh

When I was a little girl (a very, very long time ago), I used to love learning new, really big words like ‘discombobulate’. As I grew, my love of words grew too, until I loved them so much, I could not stop writing them down. One day, as I was scribbling a particular word, a very peculiar thing happened. The word shouted at me, “Stop! Don’t put me there!” As you can imagine, I was shocked and nearly fell off my chair. When I recovered somewhat, I said to the word, “Could you stop shouting, please? I am not used to it.” Can you guess what happened next? No! I thought not. The word said, “I might be small, but I will misbehave if you do not use me properly. I will not tell the story you would like me to tell. I will say something entirely different!” I dropped my pen. I hoped that by dropping my pen, the word would stop talking. Alas! It did not. It carried on chitterchobbling, even after the ink had dried. I was in a pickle. I could not allow my words to run away with my story, now could I? I don’t know about you, but when this sort of thing happens, there is only one thing left to do if you prefer not to spend your time arguing. “Very well,” said I. “I will do as you ask if you will just be quiet and allow me to concentrate.” Since that day, I have been paying special attention to every word I invite into my stories. After all, a story should say exactly what it means to say and not be led astray. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination and Founder of Dr Niamh Children's Books. www.drniamh.co.uk

4 comments on “Insights With Dr. Niamh Clune ~ To Feed A Parching Heart!

  1. Patricia Tilton
    January 21, 2014

    Beautiful and poetic! You have such a gift with words.

    Like

  2. thiskidreviewsbooks
    January 22, 2014

    Wonderful! Well-written! Wowing! 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on January 21, 2014 by in Insights, Writer/Publisher and tagged , , , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: