Dr Niamh On The Plum Tree

Childhood Imagination Sows Seeds of Future Brilliance

Editor’s Corner: 101.34

As a writer of Magic Realism, among other things, the magic is not convincing if it is not rooted entirely in the mundane world. In fact, magic realism celebrates the ordinary ~ there is such magic in the ordinary, and that requires rock solid facts, atmospheres, history, architecture, food, costumes etc. Thank you Shawn MacKenzie for another extraordinary post.

MacKENZIE's Dragon's Nest

Brass Tacks in a Box of Paper Clips

Trifles make perfection, and perfection is no trifle.
― Michelangelo Buonarroti

Scribe smallA 14th-century traveler parks his camel on the banks of the Euphrates. The water is wide and easy and teeming with fish. But what sort? Would our traveler use a line or a net – perhaps his bare hands? How would he cook his catch? Does it matter?

The short answer is, “Yes!”

Euphrates

As storytellers, we laud our ability to build worlds whole and breathe life into pen-and-ink characters. We ask our readers to believe at times the most extraordinary things. For this to work, we have to remember that stranger our tales, the more they must be grounded in something familiar.

I write fantasy. I dance around dragons and unicorns, kitsune and mystical yeti crabs. I explore unknown planets and long-forgotten civilizations. Nothing pleases me more than when people say they…

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About Dr Niamh

When I was a little girl (a very, very long time ago), I used to love learning new, really big words like ‘discombobulate’. As I grew, my love of words grew too, until I loved them so much, I could not stop writing them down. One day, as I was scribbling a particular word, a very peculiar thing happened. The word shouted at me, “Stop! Don’t put me there!” As you can imagine, I was shocked and nearly fell off my chair. When I recovered somewhat, I said to the word, “Could you stop shouting, please? I am not used to it.” Can you guess what happened next? No! I thought not. The word said, “I might be small, but I will misbehave if you do not use me properly. I will not tell the story you would like me to tell. I will say something entirely different!” I dropped my pen. I hoped that by dropping my pen, the word would stop talking. Alas! It did not. It carried on chitterchobbling, even after the ink had dried. I was in a pickle. I could not allow my words to run away with my story, now could I? I don’t know about you, but when this sort of thing happens, there is only one thing left to do if you prefer not to spend your time arguing. “Very well,” said I. “I will do as you ask if you will just be quiet and allow me to concentrate.” Since that day, I have been paying special attention to every word I invite into my stories. After all, a story should say exactly what it means to say and not be led astray. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination and Founder of Dr Niamh Children's Books. www.drniamhchildrensbooks.com

4 comments on “Editor’s Corner: 101.34

  1. Shawn MacKENZIE
    November 12, 2013

    Thank you for the reblog, Niamh. Yes, the deepest mundane roots let us travel farthest. 🙂

    Like

  2. thiskidreviewsbooks
    November 14, 2013

    I’ll be a-traveling through the blogosphere to his post! 😀

    Like

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This entry was posted on November 12, 2013 by in Editor's Corner, Guest Authors and tagged , , , , , , .
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