Dr Niamh On The Plum Tree

Childhood Imagination Sows Seeds of Future Brilliance

DreamWeaver’s Corner.

'I'm in my Frock ...' By Gilly Rochester

‘I’m in my Frock …’ By Gilly Rochester

Do you believe that your dreams are telling you something? Carl Jung was probably the first psychotherapist to treat the Psyche with respect and who believed that through dreams, soul communicates and is allowed into life. His philosophy paid particular attention to our transpersonal nature – in other words, aspects of our identity that are beyond the personal, everyday, phenomenal reality. He also believed that all the people we dream about are really aspects of our Self.

So, if we are being chased by the bogey-man, it might be an aspect or trait in us that is denied, not known, a repressed psychic content that is trying to communicate. But because it is unacknowledged, it appears as something frightening – shadowy. In Dream Therapy, we acknowledge these aspects of Self and enter into dialogue with them. In this way, we are enabled to dig deeper into Psyche to uncover deep-seated feelings and tendencies that, when expressed, may help us overcome anxiety, stress, or indeed, help us to do what Jung named, individuate and achieve wholeness.

Do you have a dream image you would like to share?

Next week, I will talk a little about The Shadow.

Many thanks to Gilly Rochester for the amazing painting, which will be featured in The All The Lonely People Anthology…Coming Soon!

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About Dr Niamh

When I was a little girl (a very, very long time ago), I used to love learning new, really big words like ‘discombobulate’. As I grew, my love of words grew too, until I loved them so much, I could not stop writing them down. One day, as I was scribbling a particular word, a very peculiar thing happened. The word shouted at me, “Stop! Don’t put me there!” As you can imagine, I was shocked and nearly fell off my chair. When I recovered somewhat, I said to the word, “Could you stop shouting, please? I am not used to it.” Can you guess what happened next? No! I thought not. The word said, “I might be small, but I will misbehave if you do not use me properly. I will not tell the story you would like me to tell. I will say something entirely different!” I dropped my pen. I hoped that by dropping my pen, the word would stop talking. Alas! It did not. It carried on chitterchobbling, even after the ink had dried. I was in a pickle. I could not allow my words to run away with my story, now could I? I don’t know about you, but when this sort of thing happens, there is only one thing left to do if you prefer not to spend your time arguing. “Very well,” said I. “I will do as you ask if you will just be quiet and allow me to concentrate.” Since that day, I have been paying special attention to every word I invite into my stories. After all, a story should say exactly what it means to say and not be led astray. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination and Founder of Dr Niamh Children's Books. www.drniamhchildrensbooks.com

17 comments on “DreamWeaver’s Corner.

  1. Shawn MacKENZIE
    March 27, 2013

    DreamWeaver’s Corner! Great. I haven’t been remembering my dreams for a while–either too exhausted or too rudely awakened by a cat to the chest. Though I have a recurrent dream which has followed me through the years about a great rambling house that goes on and on – cross between gothic and Victorian – with secret passageways under a sweeping central staircase….the sort of place one loves to get lost in…..Very archetypal, for sure. 🙂

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      March 27, 2013

      Yes! The house of your soul.

      Like

      • Shawn MacKENZIE
        March 27, 2013

        Always enjoyed Jung in my youth. Picked him up again when I was researching dragons – less helpful than I had hoped, on that score – and I might just dust him off again. 🙂 Good stuff.

        Like

      • ontheplumtree
        March 27, 2013

        Always good for inspiration, ut you are right about dragons…he sees them as symbols only.

        Like

      • Shawn MacKENZIE
        March 27, 2013

        Yes – but that’s ok. I don’t think the Old Ones mind.

        Like

      • ontheplumtree
        March 27, 2013

        Yes! They’re even older than Jung! Lol!

        Like

  2. Patricia Tilton
    March 27, 2013

    Nice article and very lovely painting by Gilly Rochester. I used to keep daily dream journals for years and I enjoyed working with my dreams. Learned a lot about myself. Love working with archetypes.

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      March 27, 2013

      Ah! The archetypal dreams are something else! You really know when you have had one of those. The depths of the soul are plumbed.

      Like

  3. Betty Dravis
    March 27, 2013

    I usually have good dreams and in living color. Don’t pay too much attention to them but often get inspiration or ideas for writing from them. Great corner, Niamh, as always. Love all your works,. Hug s- Betty ❤

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      March 27, 2013

      Many thanks Betty. It’s always so nice to have a visit from you.

      Like

  4. Betty Dravis
    March 27, 2013

    P.S. Forgot to mention that I, too, love this painting by Ms. Rochester. I adore all forms of art. Thanks for sharing and can’t wait for your LONELY book. ❤

    Like

  5. the secret keeper
    March 28, 2013

    The vividness of dreams come alive inside me. There is such a realness. Most recent since your Dreamweaver corner opened up to visitors, shattered glass covering everything in my childhood bedroom. My dead mother was present and my brother who recently tried to contact me, who has pronounced many times if he ever saw me again he would kill me. There were other childhood places that were visited in the dreams and the recurring of old TVs that never seem to work. I am trapped. My bedroom is a disaster area. No protection from outside b/c the windows are all broken. When I dream vivid, I see and remember all that I see. If my bed is covered with glass I cannot sleep safely and the floor is covered with the same so I cannot walk on it. I don’t wear footwear in the house. Dead people, those that want to kill me, now trying to contact me, and a room that no longer exists in this time covered in glass that can make you bleed and cause you great pain. I have been wondering why I do not want to sleep besides not wanting to take a break from the creative projects I am working on or feeling that there is such a limited time to be alive that I do not want to give any of that time up. Who would want to face these dreams and the mounting feelings of depression when I get into bed and try to sleep. It all plays its games with my mind. Sleep is needed but to me does not feel like something that is very friendly escape from the awake world which also carries its own demons that haunt me at times. But at least while awake I have some sort of control. I can do my art & writing to work through those demons with an awakened awareness. To me it feels like there is a great deal of danger that surrounds me when I am awake or asleep.

    I love the images in the painting that you chose Niamh for the Anthology in Loneliness. It reminds me of a true story of a bullfighter who sat down during a bullfight. The bull came over to him and just stood there staring at the man who was suppose to kill him. The bullfighter looked in the kindness of the bulls eyes and saw the picks sticking out of the back of his neck. It was time to insert the sword. He looked into the bulls eyes. The bull wasn’t trying to attack him. He didn’t understand why this man was doing this. Soon the man realized he didn’t understand why he was doing it either. He saw how wonderful a creature the bull was and how gentle and how unthreatening he behaved. It was then and there that the bullfighter gave up his sword and vowed never to fight a bull again. He saw how brutal it was to want to kill such a sensitive creature as this bull was. So he let the bull live and retired permanently. The image and the story was so profound. They met on equal grounds. How lonely for each before that moment, to be engaged in such a violent and lonely sport as one man to kill and one animal to be sacrificed in a sport that was so abhorrent. It was a day of freedom and release for at least these two.

    Thank you for what you do Niamh. It is of such major importance to so many.

    Love, Jennifer

    Like

  6. Darlene
    April 1, 2013

    I love the painting.! I would love to learn more about dreams as I believe they have deeper meaning than we realize.

    Like

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