Dr Niamh's Plum Tree Creative Community

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The Rolling Bones

Some time ago, I watched The Apprentice, Lord Alan Sugar’s TV romp. I have to admit, I was amazed at what some of those youngsters got away with. That week, the task was to create a free magazine to sell advertising to a niche market. One team decided on an upmarket lad’s mag; the other wanted to cash in on the 60′s plus age group. 60 is the new 30! That kind of thing.

The little band of wanna-be-Alan-Sugars named their over 60’s mag, ‘Hip Replacement’ and set out to do their market research. They interviewed some rather smart, fit and obviously intelligent over sixties at their golf or bowls club, (wherever, can’t remember, must be my age!)  When the unsuspecting, potentially future customers were told the name of the magazine, they were polite, good mannered and dignified but definitely not impressed.

One of the young things suggested the magazine run great events such as a series of articles that might slowly teach “old people” how to use the phone.  All I can say, dear readers, is that myself and my husband practically spat our single malt all over the floor, as we gasped in disbelief at what appeared to be astonishing, patronising ignorance of my age group.

We had a bit of a laugh at how those particular youngsters took themselves and their ‘great ideas’ so seriously. I can’t blame them for that. We also took ourselves seriously in those far distant days when we reveled in our youth, intensity and arrogance.

We came up with an alternative brand-name for the magazine deciding to call it: ‘The Rolling Bones!’

tongue sticking out rolling stonesWhy not? Our favourite bands back in those distant days were, the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin to name but a few. All are still going strong having hugely influenced the music of today. We read Sartre, Nietzsche, Gurdjieff and Germaine Greer! We invented the mini skirt, wore Zandra Rhodes and Mary Quant, We burned the bra and challenged stereotypes. We might not have gone to war as the previous generation had, but we waged war of another kind, a war of ideologies promoting the idea of passive resistance (famously initiated by Gandhi).  We  challenged the status quo and class structure.  We started Civil Rights movements. We marched to Ban the Bomb. We became aware of what we were doing to the planet and campaigned, pleaded and staged sit-ins to warn world governments to pay heed.

We imported eastern religions and challenged Christian and Catholic religious politics. We learned to think for ourselves.

So I decided on the Rolling Bones. Personally, I have been forced to learn more than how to use a phone. Still living every precious moment of life to the full is a challenge; being open to learning new things; remaining humble; valuing each other; treating our fellow inhabitants of planet earth with respect is a challenge, and by that, I mean the animal and vegetable kingdoms also; not to mention being grandparents to the new, effervescent baby souls come to play among us to remind us of the joy of curiosity and of how beautiful the world is. But where would we be without challenge?

We roll on, my husband and I, metaphorically occasionally donning our Che Guevara hats, enjoying moderation in all things and glad that we are not yet in need of a hip replacement!

Oh Well! Back to the Rolling Stones, single malt, good wine and in my case, being a lover of writing little words!

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About Dr Niamh

When I was a little girl (a very, very long time ago), I used to love learning new, really big words like ‘discombobulate’. As I grew, my love of words grew too, until I loved them so much, I could not stop writing them down. One day, as I was scribbling a particular word, a very peculiar thing happened. The word shouted at me, “Stop! Don’t put me there!” As you can imagine, I was shocked and nearly fell off my chair. When I recovered somewhat, I said to the word, “Could you stop shouting, please? I am not used to it.” Can you guess what happened next? No! I thought not. The word said, “I might be small, but I will misbehave if you do not use me properly. I will not tell the story you would like me to tell. I will say something entirely different!” I dropped my pen. I hoped that by dropping my pen, the word would stop talking. Alas! It did not. It carried on chitterchobbling, even after the ink had dried. I was in a pickle. I could not allow my words to run away with my story, now could I? I don’t know about you, but when this sort of thing happens, there is only one thing left to do if you prefer not to spend your time arguing. “Very well,” said I. “I will do as you ask if you will just be quiet and allow me to concentrate.” Since that day, I have been paying special attention to every word I invite into my stories. After all, a story should say exactly what it means to say and not be led astray. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination and Founder of Dr Niamh Children's Books. www.drniamh.co.uk

16 comments on “The Rolling Bones

  1. Darlene
    January 26, 2013

    Well put my friend! We are a much hipper generation than those before us and we have accomplished a lot. (and we are not done yet!!) Here’s to The Rolling Bones. I love it.

    Like

  2. DiAnne Ebejer
    January 26, 2013

    Ha! This was great! 🙂

    Like

  3. Patricia Tilton
    January 26, 2013

    This truly made me laugh! The young people of today don’t have a clue the impact we had on our world (even though I do struggle with some of the technology). We lived in exciting time and we brought change — BIG CHANGE– that paved thei way. We were idealistic and thought those in their 60s had one foot in the grave. But, oh how history repeats itself. It is the role of the youth to break up old crystalizatins so that new thoughts, ideas and solutions can spring forth. We however, are in our power years and have much wisdom to share. Together, we could do great things!

    Like

  4. Juliette
    January 26, 2013

    I love it! And I’m glad to say we’re raising our daughter to appreciate the classics (Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck etc). You can’t for forward until you know where you’ve been. Thanks for the smile!

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      January 26, 2013

      And Jeff beck was my favourite guitarist…loved him much more than Eric Clapton…you have great taste, Juliette!

      Like

  5. Pingback: The Rolling Bones « West Coast Review

  6. the secret keeper
    January 27, 2013

    The rebellipos generation is still rebellious today. We are on the front line. If you didn’t live in the 60/70s you have no idea what revolution really is. And I would say that our parents were from the dark ages, at least mine were. They voted for Richard Nixon & were true Republicans. Drugs Sex Rock n’ Roll is/was not a bad slogan. We had fun. Now today kids might have fn but there are too many things to worry about. The police do still arrest those who protest. That hasn’t changed but now there is AIDS and in the US the tea baggers. That would bum anyone out. But we learned from Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. Stone Beatles Janis Joplin & TM. We were the wild generation. Great incentive and great post. Made be do some time travelling. Which I seem to be doing a lot of these days. Thanks, Niamh. You are once again on top of the pulse of the world. YEAH! jk

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      January 27, 2013

      Many thanks, Jennifer…it was a revolution, or so we thought.

      Like

  7. Uncle Tree
    January 27, 2013

    Wow, you took me back! Back to high school,
    when I had a large decal of those big red lips
    and tongue from Sticky Fingers on the back
    of my blue-jean jacket. It’s not that The Stones
    were my favorite band, but if I remember correctly,
    at the time, the sticker for Lucy In The Sky was sold-out.

    Yes! The Moody Blues were, and still remain, to my ears,
    Rock-n-Roll’s best mystical and beautiful listening material.

    “Are you sitting comfortably?” Peace & Luvz, Û┬

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      January 27, 2013

      Uncle Tree, I made an album with Tony Clarke, the man who produced The Moody Blues. We recorded it in Nassau, Bahamas, and it was just on the cusp of Punk, so EMI never released it. But Tony Clarke made the Moody Blues the success they became.

      Like

      • Uncle Tree
        January 27, 2013

        Too cool, Niamh! 🙂 And, that’s too bad.
        I’d of never guessed you to be an ex-punk rocker.
        Got any old pictures? lol We’d love to see ’em.

        Like

      • ontheplumtree
        January 27, 2013

        I am not an ex-punk-rocker. I belonged to the previous era. And because punk came in, that changed the music scene and I stopped singing.

        Like

  8. Uncle Tree
    January 29, 2013

    I apologize for the insult, Niamh. My bad. I have no idea
    what your scene was like before the Sex Pistols or whoever.
    Should I be thinking more along the lines of Blondie or Patti Smith?

    Like

    • ontheplumtree
      January 29, 2013

      Oh My Goodness! No insult taken…My era was more Bob Dylan, Melanie, Carol King, Roberta Flack, Janis Joplin, James Taylor…to mention only a few of my heroes. I loved melody, still do and felt that when Punk came in, melody went out and I couldn’t relate to it anymore. The music industry is fickle, and I wanted to sing songs I loved. I sang many of my own songs too. It is a long time ago, and I had a ball!

      Like

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