Dr Niamh's Plum Tree Creative Community

Who is on the plum tree?

In old age…

re-tire me,
lose me,
in rubber sea,
cannot move,
cannot be,
my destiny,
discarded be,
on scrap-heap’s floor,
cast adrift
as toxic waste,
of use no more,
though far I traveled,
the shiny road,
before I slipped…

copyright Niamh Clune 2012

Do we take care of our elderly? 

About Dr Niamh

When I was a little girl (a very, very long time ago), I used to love learning new, really big words like ‘discombobulate’. As I grew, my love of words grew too, until I loved them so much, I could not stop writing them down. One day, as I was scribbling a particular word, a very peculiar thing happened. The word shouted at me, “Stop! Don’t put me there!” As you can imagine, I was shocked and nearly fell off my chair. When I recovered somewhat, I said to the word, “Could you stop shouting, please? I am not used to it.” Can you guess what happened next? No! I thought not. The word said, “I might be small, but I will misbehave if you do not use me properly. I will not tell the story you would like me to tell. I will say something entirely different!” I dropped my pen. I hoped that by dropping my pen, the word would stop talking. Alas! It did not. It carried on chitterchobbling, even after the ink had dried. I was in a pickle. I could not allow my words to run away with my story, now could I? I don’t know about you, but when this sort of thing happens, there is only one thing left to do if you prefer not to spend your time arguing. “Very well,” said I. “I will do as you ask if you will just be quiet and allow me to concentrate.” Since that day, I have been paying special attention to every word I invite into my stories. After all, a story should say exactly what it means to say and not be led astray. With love from Dr. Niamh, Ph.D in Learning Through The Imagination and Founder of Dr Niamh Children's Books. www.drniamh.co.uk

12 comments on “In old age…

  1. Betty Dravis
    November 15, 2012

    Deep meaning and much food for thought in this poem, Niamh. I fear this is true in many situations…and we often don’t take care of our young properly either…depends on the individuals and their lifestyles. God bless us all. <3


  2. the secret keeper
    November 15, 2012

    If you loved your parents, it would be great to go back to the days when extended families lived together. My grandfather came to live with us when my grandmother died. I loved having him live with us. He was the most loving member in tthe whole house. It seemed natural to me to have him there. Nursing homes or places that store the elderly seem barbaric. Unless someone is beyond reachable mentally or physically in need of constant health care it is a wonderful things to have loved ones together. My grandmother died the day she was told she would be moved from the hospital to a nursing. She was in a state of recovery and didn’t need such care. She vowed that she would never go into one of those places. So after being told this she just gave up and she died that day. It wasn’t suppose to happen that way. If they just let her go home I’m sure that she would have been okay. But her son and daughter turned her away and I feel it broke her heart and her spirit. That’s what is being done to the older senior citizens today. They are being thrown away. If my grandmother were alive today she would definitely be living with me. I love her still to this day and would never throw her away. She was too valuable to me as a grandmother and person who was vital and had great energy. I wish that I could share my life with my new family. And I think she would be thrilled living with my partner and me and all our animal family. j.k.


    • the secret keeper
      November 15, 2012

      That is suppose to say “I wish she could her life with me and my partner and animal family. What a gift that would be.” j.k


    • ontheplumtree
      November 15, 2012

      Thank you, Jennifer for your touching comment. Yes! It does break your heart and your spirit to end your life without a home, and without those you love.


  3. baubo60
    November 15, 2012

    These words represent my feelings at present, and I’m ‘only’ 60! And ready for life!


  4. thiskidreviewsbooks
    November 15, 2012

    Care for the Old
    By Erik

    Our elders must be
    Taken care of greatly.

    Clean their bed,
    Cook their food,

    Help their needs,
    Love them with a whole heart.

    Talk with them,
    Read to them.

    Listen to them.
    Learn from them.

    If you don’t,
    What about the next generations?

    My great-grandfather is 94. He lives with my grandparents and we are staying with them too right now because we are building a new house. I talk to him a lot. He has a lot of good stories. :)


    • ontheplumtree
      November 15, 2012

      Sweet, dear boy, Erik! I am sure that all your grandparents, great and small, love you with their whole hearts!


  5. Uncle Tree
    November 17, 2012

    That was a wonderful, but serious slip-up, Niamh!
    Cronyism is alive, and well…dying –
    giving us all the more reason to be thankful.
    :) Thanks for sharing! Peace and luvz, Keith


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